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Is the NHS sleepwalking into crisis?

The number of patients waiting too long for routine operations has risen to its highest level in nearly a decade.

New NHS data shows over 400,000 people waited longer than the official 18-week target for non-urgent treatment in August, with hundreds remaining on waiting lists for more than a year.

The latest waits are the highest for a single month since 2008, while the number of patients treated within the NHS target has fallen to its lowest point since 2011.

This has caused a strain on the NHS services in the summer months which is normally seen in winter.

The raft of new NHS statistics also laid bare strains in other areas as patients faced longer waits in A&E and cancer treatment times had slipped, although bed blocking rates had improved.

To ensure the NHS is able to cope with the inevitable spike in demand during the winter period, the Government needs to urgently put in place measures to address the funding, capacity and recruitment issues facing the system as a whole.

Shadow Health Secretary Jonathan Ashworth said the “shocking” figures showed how the winter crisis had extended to the rest of the year, prompting concerns over patient wellbeing.

Earlier, Mr Hunt told GPs there was no “silver bullet” to the problems facing them, but the Government was “absolutely committed” to increasing funding and capacity.

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Flu warning may put the NHS at risk?

Hospitals have been urged to brace themselves this winter season, as other countries have struggled to cope with an outbreak of flu. Some hospitals in Australia have had to close their doors to patients as they have struggled to cope.

The NHS will have to do a great deal of work over the next 2 months to ensure everything is in place to deal with the winter ahead.

GP services will be put under pressure trying to cope with the high demand of flu vaccinations, while hospitals will have to find extra beds.

The reality is that extra funding is needed to help with the existing pressures. It would help to free up extra bed capacity in hospitals, help to recruit more doctors, nurses and care home staff during winter pressures.

Doctors to declare private earnings

NHS England have announced plans to publish NHS Consultants earnings from private work undertaken in their own free time outside their NHS contracts by April next year.
It’s estimated that half of the 46,000 consultants in England top up their average £112,000 per year earnings by doing private work.

The concerns raised are in relation to conflicts of interest and suggestions that some may delegate much of their NHS work to junior colleagues which can in turn increase waiting times. There is even suggestion that some may take advantage of extended waiting lists to syphon off additional private work to line their own pockets.

Sir Malcolm Grant, Chairman of NHS England, stated on the matter: ‘We have a responsibility to use the £110bn healthcare budget provided by the taxpayer to the best effect possible for patients, with integrity, and free from undue influence. Spending decisions in healthcare should never be influenced by thoughts of private gain.’

However Neil Tolley, Chairman of the London Consultants’ Association disagreed with the plans saying: ‘What you earn in your own time is your own business and nothing to do with the NHS. We are very suspicious that this information will be used for political purposes.’ He continued: ‘I don’t feel there’s any conflict of interest. If you’re a doctor doing private work, that will already be with the knowledge of your hospital. You are already showing transparency.’

Will GPs be next on the hit list for transparency of earnings?

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My Son is my Twin!

It’s been almost 20 years since Dolly the Sheep shocked the world and sparked moral debate regards cloning, but this week has been ablaze with new research findings sparking all kinds of new fanciful concepts like “parenting your non-identical twin” etc.
Earlier this year scientists in China reported they have created human embryos without the use of sperm. They took stem cells and tricked them into becoming a precursor of sperm called primordial germ cells and following this they then tricked them into becoming the next phase in sperm development called spermatids by exposing them to ordinary testicular cells and testosterone. They managed to successfully fertilise mice eggs with this artificial sperm – thus removing the need for male sperm – opening all kinds of doors for male infertility or for the fantasists – a world a without the need for men.
Earlier this week scientists from the University of Bath reported they have evidence that one day we could create babies without the need for eggs. They created mice pseudo-embryos by manipulation of unfertilised eggs and then successfully created real embryos by injecting them with sperm. They argue that pseudo-embryos are much like ordinary cells in many of their properties and their research suggests that it may be possible to achieve fertilisation of cells other than eggs one day. Now our fantasists are dreaming up a world without women.
It just got more exciting for those of you who love this stuff, as a group in China just yesterday reported they have successfully created 30 Human Embryo Clones.
All of this means there is hope on the horizon for couples with fertility problems, with the possibility of all kinds of magical combinations available, especially for same sex couples wanting to have a biological child of their own.
The question now is who will take that first step into the ethical mind storm and bring a cloned human into the world. Dolly the sheep was named after Dolly Parton, as the cloned cell was from a sheep’s udder in reference to the singer’s famous bust. What will the first human be called?

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Foreign Doctors could leave NHS

Proposed new visa rules could cause a shortfall of Doctors from other countries getting picked for specialist training, the British Medical Associated has warned.

Foreign Doctors would find it more difficult to pursue their chosen field in the NHS under the proposed changes and many may have no choice but to leave the UK to complete their training.

 

The NHS is already under pressure to retain Junior Doctors with more and more choosing to go abroad for better pay and working conditions thanks to the new contracts being imposed.

With a move to a normal seven day working week and a need to recruit an additional 5,000 doctors by 2020, these visa changes could have a great impact on this, the BMA has stated

The new visa changes mean priority is given to UK and EU citizens when applying for specialist posts under the Resident Labour Market Test. This may push international graduates to leave the UK to pursue their career ambitions elsewhere.

A source from the BMA has said, “What these recommendations propose is that students from overseas who have obtained a UK medical degree will be left until last in line to get a job. “

“This will very likely leave them unable to pursue a career in the specialty they wish to work in, and leave them with little option but to take their much-needed medical training and expertise to another country’s health service where they are able to continue their training.”

“This would be a completely obstructive move at a time when the NHS is facing unprecedented pressure and huge staff shortages.”