Doctors to declare private earnings

NHS England have announced plans to publish NHS Consultants earnings from private work undertaken in their own free time outside their NHS contracts by April next year.
It’s estimated that half of the 46,000 consultants in England top up their average £112,000 per year earnings by doing private work.

The concerns raised are in relation to conflicts of interest and suggestions that some may delegate much of their NHS work to junior colleagues which can in turn increase waiting times. There is even suggestion that some may take advantage of extended waiting lists to syphon off additional private work to line their own pockets.

Sir Malcolm Grant, Chairman of NHS England, stated on the matter: ‘We have a responsibility to use the £110bn healthcare budget provided by the taxpayer to the best effect possible for patients, with integrity, and free from undue influence. Spending decisions in healthcare should never be influenced by thoughts of private gain.’

However Neil Tolley, Chairman of the London Consultants’ Association disagreed with the plans saying: ‘What you earn in your own time is your own business and nothing to do with the NHS. We are very suspicious that this information will be used for political purposes.’ He continued: ‘I don’t feel there’s any conflict of interest. If you’re a doctor doing private work, that will already be with the knowledge of your hospital. You are already showing transparency.’

Will GPs be next on the hit list for transparency of earnings?

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My Son is my Twin!

It’s been almost 20 years since Dolly the Sheep shocked the world and sparked moral debate regards cloning, but this week has been ablaze with new research findings sparking all kinds of new fanciful concepts like “parenting your non-identical twin” etc.
Earlier this year scientists in China reported they have created human embryos without the use of sperm. They took stem cells and tricked them into becoming a precursor of sperm called primordial germ cells and following this they then tricked them into becoming the next phase in sperm development called spermatids by exposing them to ordinary testicular cells and testosterone. They managed to successfully fertilise mice eggs with this artificial sperm – thus removing the need for male sperm – opening all kinds of doors for male infertility or for the fantasists – a world a without the need for men.
Earlier this week scientists from the University of Bath reported they have evidence that one day we could create babies without the need for eggs. They created mice pseudo-embryos by manipulation of unfertilised eggs and then successfully created real embryos by injecting them with sperm. They argue that pseudo-embryos are much like ordinary cells in many of their properties and their research suggests that it may be possible to achieve fertilisation of cells other than eggs one day. Now our fantasists are dreaming up a world without women.
It just got more exciting for those of you who love this stuff, as a group in China just yesterday reported they have successfully created 30 Human Embryo Clones.
All of this means there is hope on the horizon for couples with fertility problems, with the possibility of all kinds of magical combinations available, especially for same sex couples wanting to have a biological child of their own.
The question now is who will take that first step into the ethical mind storm and bring a cloned human into the world. Dolly the sheep was named after Dolly Parton, as the cloned cell was from a sheep’s udder in reference to the singer’s famous bust. What will the first human be called?

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Junior Doctors’ Strike

Junior Doctors went on strike this week resulting in over 3,000 operations being cancelled nationwide.

Patients were urged to see their GPs instead of attending hospital.

NHS England said about 10,000 junior doctors had reported for duty out of 26,000 scheduled to work the day shift on Tuesday – although many of those had agreed in advance to come in to make sure emergency cover was provided and others were not members of the BMA.

The action came after the BMA and the government failed to reach agreement on a proposed new contract for junior doctors.

The BMA, which is concerned about pay for weekend working, career progression and safeguards to protect doctors from being overworked, said the strike had sent a “clear message” to the government.

However, Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt described the walkout as “completely unnecessary” and urged junior doctors to return to the negotiating table.

Officials from Acas (Conciliation service) said they would hold discussions with both sides, although government sources said they were still prepared to impose the contract if the deadlock could not be broken.

Danny Mortimer, chief executive of NHS Employers, which represents the government in contract talks, said he hoped that would not happen.

“I’m really hopeful that when the BMA return to the talks we can give junior doctors more confidence in both the pay offer that we’re putting to them, but also the improved protections we want to put in place around their safety.

“I am desperate to avoid another repeat of industrial action at the end of the month. It’s not in their interest and it’s not in the interest of patients.”

The next proposed strike is a 48-hour one beginning on 26 January.