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Is the NHS sleepwalking into crisis?

The number of patients waiting too long for routine operations has risen to its highest level in nearly a decade.

New NHS data shows over 400,000 people waited longer than the official 18-week target for non-urgent treatment in August, with hundreds remaining on waiting lists for more than a year.

The latest waits are the highest for a single month since 2008, while the number of patients treated within the NHS target has fallen to its lowest point since 2011.

This has caused a strain on the NHS services in the summer months which is normally seen in winter.

The raft of new NHS statistics also laid bare strains in other areas as patients faced longer waits in A&E and cancer treatment times had slipped, although bed blocking rates had improved.

To ensure the NHS is able to cope with the inevitable spike in demand during the winter period, the Government needs to urgently put in place measures to address the funding, capacity and recruitment issues facing the system as a whole.

Shadow Health Secretary Jonathan Ashworth said the “shocking” figures showed how the winter crisis had extended to the rest of the year, prompting concerns over patient wellbeing.

Earlier, Mr Hunt told GPs there was no “silver bullet” to the problems facing them, but the Government was “absolutely committed” to increasing funding and capacity.

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Flu warning may put the NHS at risk?

Hospitals have been urged to brace themselves this winter season, as other countries have struggled to cope with an outbreak of flu. Some hospitals in Australia have had to close their doors to patients as they have struggled to cope.

The NHS will have to do a great deal of work over the next 2 months to ensure everything is in place to deal with the winter ahead.

GP services will be put under pressure trying to cope with the high demand of flu vaccinations, while hospitals will have to find extra beds.

The reality is that extra funding is needed to help with the existing pressures. It would help to free up extra bed capacity in hospitals, help to recruit more doctors, nurses and care home staff during winter pressures.

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The Importance of Locums

A GP online poll in 2016 suggested that three in five GP surgeries had to rely a great deal on locums to ensure they could provide services to patients.

23% of surgeries needed locums to provide nearly a fifth of GP appointments during the last year. (The poll had 370 partners and salaried GPs)

This was an increase compared to a similar poll conducted by GPonline last year. Last year just 14% said over a fifth of appointments were conducted by locums.

Around 6% of GPs confirmed more than 40% of appointments in their practice were being covered by locums.

The GPC said the data showed the ‘serious’ impact of workforce shortages and showed the essential role of locums.

GPC sessional committee chair Dr Zoe Norris warned earlier this month that many vulnerable practices would collapse overnight if doctors were forced out of locum roles.

Around 59% of GPs said the amount of appointments filled by locums in their surgeries increased over the last year.

It is becoming apparent that the NHS needs locums with their floating coverage in order to sustain services and relieve Partners for holidays or other commitments as surgeries are too stretched to be able to provide that cover from in-house. Shouldn’t NHS England and the local CCGs do more to support this fundamental part of the workforce instead of trying to force them out?